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Pulmonary High Blood Pressure

The medically more correct name for pulmonary high blood pressure is “arterial pulmonary hypertension” or simply “pulmonary hypertension”. Indiscriminate prescribing of Fen-Phen, which were used as diet pills and consisted of two weight loss medications in combination, led to another form of hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, as a serious side-effect.

It was a rare complication, but so significant that the FDA decided to withdraw the products from the market. Fenfluramine and phentermine in concert were more effective in weight loss than each alone, but the side-effects were super additive as well.

They led in some cases to fibrotic permanent changes of heart valves and the lining of the pulmonary vessels. This led to breathing problems, high blood pressure inside the pulmonary vessels and to congestive heart failure resistant to the normal medical therapy resulting in premature death (Ref. 7, p. 1195). Here is a link to a site where more in-depth info (thanks to www.phassociation.org for this link) is available regarding this topic.

Pulmonary High Blood Pressure

Pulmonary High Blood Pressure

My approach to obesity is completely drug free as I have pointed out throughout the Net Health Book. I am recommending a comprehensive multistep program involving balanced nutrition, fitness as well as stress management.

This involves a change in attitude resulting in a permanent constructive life style change. This is described in detail on the page entitled “Health, nutrition and fitness”, which you find as link under “Related Topics” below.

 

References:

1. “The seventh report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure ( JNC IV ), 2004”

2. JS Trilling et al. Arch Fam Med 2000 Sep/Oct (9): 794-801.

3. DJ Hyman et al. Arch Intern Med 2000 Aug 160(15): 2281-2286.

4. CP Tifft Curr Hypertens Rep 2000 Jun (3): 243-246.

5. The Merck Manual, 7th edition, by M. H. Beers et al., Whitehouse Station, N.J., 1999. Chapter 199.

6. Noble: Textbook of Primary Care Medicine, 3rd ed.,2001, Mosby Inc.

7. Goroll: Primary Care Medicine, 4th ed., 2000, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

8. Ferri: Ferri’s Clinical Advisor: Instant Diagnosis and Treatment, 2004 ed., Copyright © 2004 Mosby, Inc.

9. Rakel: Conn’s Current Therapy 2004, 56th ed., Copyright © 2004 Elsevier

Last modified: October 22, 2014

Disclaimer
This outline is only a teaching aid to patients and should stimulate you to ask the right questions when seeing your doctor. However, the responsibility of treatment stays in the hands of your doctor and you.